River View

Things are slow in the travel and adventure arena at the moment. Oh, conditions are great! The kiddies are back in school, the fair-weather ‘campers’ and RVers have packed up their tents and winterized their lines, the weather is nice and cool, and the sun has been out!

Unfortunately, DW and I have been unable to get our schedules arranged for much mutual free time; we used to have afternoons and evenings for some extensive bike riding, but her new position shifted her working hours. She goes in later and comes home later. By the time she gets home she’s more tired, and in the autumn the sun goes down sooner. No bike rides. I’m now home two hours before she is, and the expectation is I’ll do some housework in that time, and have dinner ready when she walks in the door.

We won’t go there.

We have, however, managed to squeeze together a couple of days in mid-December for a little boondocking trip, and we thought we’d give Wayne National Forest a look-see. It’s not far, and has free dispersed camping throughout the forest; we’re just not sure how well it’s set up for dispersed camping in a van. So we figured a little reconnaissance of the area, before we head down for camping trip, is in order.

Our topographical maps ( and I love my iPad app for this function) show a lot of hilly terrain, but there appear to be level areas where a van could park, and unpaved roads with access back to those sites. More importantly, the topo map depicts areas within the National Forest which are privately owned, and could not be legally accessed without permission. Verifying the terrain with an online satellite view, as well, shows new structures in the area, that have been built since the maps were made, as well as more accurately depicts clearings in the forest, or other obstructions that might make the area undesirable for camping.

Since it’s so close, we’re going to take a day to do a quick recce, to drive through and check it out, before taking the camper down for a few days. Although a lot of the fun of boondocking and traveling are the unexpected sights and events, a little proper prior planning, or a little foreknowledge of the area, never hurts. We’ll take Gail’s compact car for that, to save on gas. I wouldn’t mind talking to a couple of the rangers, either, to get their advice on boondocking areas; and make sure I have any emergency phone numbers for the area.

It never hurts.

Well, it won’t be too much longer before DW retires, and we’ll have a lot more free time together for traveling. Then, I can get after HER about getting housework done, and having my dinner ready when I walk in the door, and….

We’d better not go there.